FAA Drone No Flight Zone UAV Mentor

What are the 5 major airspace restrictions for UAV Drones

Coming from a background where safety is priority # 1, I have witnessed the positive impact of abiding by safety protocols.  On the other hand, I have read about safety scenarios that ranged from injuries on the job to fatalities that could have been prevented if the individual adhered to safety restrictions.

It is very important to always be vigilant when operating your uav/drone and it is imperative that you abide by the FAA drone airspace restrictions.

What are the 5 major airspace restrictions for UAV / Drones

Although there are numerous types of airspace restrictions, the 5 major airspace restrictions for UAV drones follows below:

1.  Airports

Drone pilots are required to give notice to both the airport operator and the air control tower if they plan to fly their drone within a 5 mile radius of an airport and if the airport has a tower.  There is one caveat for recreational operations.  Recreational operations are now allowed in Class B airspace around most major airports without specific air traffic permission and coordination.  I am currently working on an interactive map that shows the airports with the radium buffer (see image below).  There are also numerous sources available online which shows the restricted areas.

USA UAV NO FLY ZONE
USA UAV NO FLY ZONE

2.  Restricted Airspace

This should come as no surprise that the airspace surrounding Washington DC is the most restricted area in the USA.  It is illegal to fly your UAV / UAS / Drone in any of the airspace above the Nation’s capital.  For more information, visit DC No Drone Zone.

3.  Temporary Flight Restrictions

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is a geographical-limited, short-term, airspace restriction, typically in the USA.  Temporary Flight Restrictions often encompass natural disaster areas, space launches, air shows, and Presidential movements.  You can always access the list of active TFRs to view them.

4.  Wildfires

Everyone needs to adhere to not flying Drones / UAVs near wildfires.  This is a serious topic because it puts lives at risk.  The reality is a small Drone / UAV can cause a fatal accident if it collides with a firefighting aircraft.  Also, firefighting aircraft typically must land if a drone / uav is spotted due to safety concerns.  This has the adverse effect of prolonging firefighting operations and putting more lives at risk.

Firefighting Aircraft

Firefighting Aircraft

Per the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, 43 CFR 9212.1(f), it is illegal to interfere with firefighting efforts to extinguish a fire.

Bottom Line… Please do not fly your drone near a wildfire!!

5.  Stadiums

Viznu Sport Stadium
Viznu Sport Stadium

There are rules surrounding flying Drones / UAVs in and around stadiums starting one hour and ending one hour after the scheduled time of any of the following events:

  • Major League Football
  • NCAA Division I Football
  • Major League Baseball
  • Nascar, Indy Car, and Champ Series Races

In addition, flying your Drone / UAV is strictly prohibited within a radius of three nautical miles of the venue or stadium.

Sporting Event Temporary Flight Restriction
Sporting Event Temporary Flight Restriction

If we adhere to these restrictions, we will all enjoy a safe outing with our drone / uav… whether it be for commercial or recreational use.

 

As Managing Director of the Fugro Land Survey group within the USA, Carlos Femmer is responsible for the company's corridor airborne and remote sensing divisions (i.e. transmission, rail and pipeline) , oil and gas division, and coastal hydrography team within the USA, but this blog, its content and opinions are my own. Femmer graduated with a bachelor's degree in management information systems from University of Massachusetts and received his master's degree in business (MBA) from Louisiana State University. He lives in Lafayette with his wife and four children.

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About Me

About Me

As Managing Director of the Fugro Land Survey group within the USA, Carlos Femmer is responsible for the company's corridor airborne and remote sensing divisions (i.e. transmission, rail and pipeline) , oil and gas division, and coastal hydrography team within the USA, but this blog, its content and opinions are my own. Femmer graduated with a bachelor's degree in management information systems from University of Massachusetts and received his master's degree in business (MBA) from Louisiana State University. He lives in Lafayette with his wife and four children.

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